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(p. 53) 3. Liberal Equality 

(p. 53) 3. Liberal Equality
Chapter:
(p. 53) 3. Liberal Equality
Author(s):

Will Kymlicka

DOI:
10.1093/hepl/9780198782742.003.0003
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date: 28 October 2020

This chapter examines the notion of liberal equality by considering John Rawls’s alternative to utilitarianism. In his A Theory of Justice, Rawls complains that political theory was caught between two extremes: utilitarianism on the one side, and what he calls ‘intuitionism’ on the other. The chapter presents Rawls’s ideas, first by discussing the two arguments he gives for his answer to the question of justice: the intuitive equality of opportunity argument and the social contract argument. It also analyses Ronald Dworkin’s views on equality of resources, focusing on his theory that involves the use of auctions, insurance schemes, free markets, and taxation. Finally, it explores the politics of liberal equality, arguing that liberals need to think seriously about adopting more radical politics.

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