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(p. 231) 13. John Locke 

(p. 231) 13. John Locke
Chapter:
(p. 231) 13. John Locke
Author(s):

Jeremy Waldron

DOI:
10.1093/hepl/9780198708926.003.0013
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date: 29 October 2020

This chapter examines and defends the relevance of John Locke's writings as political philosophy. Locke's political philosophy continues to have an enormous impact on the framing and the pursuit of liberal ideas in modern political thought — ideas about social contract, government by consent, natural law, equality, individual rights, civil disobedience, and private property. The discussion and application of Locke's arguments is thus an indispensable feature of political philosophy as it is practised today. After providing a short biography of Locke, the chapter considers his views on equality and natural law, property, economy, and disagreement, as well as limited government, toleration, and the rule of law. It concludes with an assessment of Locke's legacy as a political thinker.

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