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Chapter

Cover Security Studies: Critical Perspectives

10. Gender and sexuality  

Jennifer Hobbs and Laura McLeod

This chapter assesses the relevance of gender and sexuality for understanding how security/insecurity are distributed in the world. Our ideas about gender and sexuality—that men and women are the only genders, and that each gender has particular bodies, characteristics, and abilities—have been used for centuries to enact and justify the oppression of women and those who do not fit into this gender binary. As such, gender and sexuality form part of the unequal distribution of insecurity and violence we see in the world. The chapter looks at this topic bearing in mind specifically the following critical questions: security for whom, where, how, and at whose expense? To do so, it utilizes three key feminist concepts: intersectionality, the everyday, and transformation. The chapter argues that gender and sexuality help us gain a critical perspective of security/insecurity by revealing new areas of study, and helping us to see traditional security topics in a new light.

Book

Cover Security Studies: Critical Perspectives

Xavier Guillaume and Kyle Grayson

Security Studies: Critical Perspectives takes a question-centred approach by introducing the analysis of security from critical and interdisciplinary perspectives. It provides a set of analytic steps so that readers develop the critical thinking skills and confidence to ask important questions about security and our worlds in contemporary politics. Common-sense security assumptions that reproduce forms of oppression and domination are revealed and their justifications decentred while perspectives inclusive of class, gender and sexualities, ethnicity and race, religion, disability, culture and ideology, political belonging, and the global south are introduced. In doing so, the chapters in this book combine critical analysis with concrete empirical issues that connect readers to the social and political worlds around them.

Chapter

Cover Contemporary Security Studies

11. Gender and Security  

Caroline Kennedy-Pipe and Sophia Dingli

This chapter examines issues of gender and security. It begins with an explanation of what we mean by gender and explains why issues of gender are central to understanding security. International Relations specialists have over the last three decades explored and interpreted the ways in which men and women have responded to the national and international policies which have governed conflict, terrorism, and war. The chapter demonstrates that through understanding and placing notions of gender at the centre of any debate on security one can unleash a series of interlocking understandings of the way men and women relate to insecurity, violence, and war.

Chapter

Cover Contemporary Terrorism Studies

15. Gendered and Racialized Terrorism  

Caron E. Gentry

This chapter focuses on gendered and racial terrorism. One reason that terrorism is perceived as significantly worse than state violence is because of how gender and race have become delegitimizing forces in socio-political life. Post-structuralism and intersectionality are used in this chapter to try to understand how terrorism is subjective. This is particularly the case in terms of the power structures of gender and race. Gender and race structures use essentialization and idealization to create and maintain hierarchical relationships between people and objects such as states and terrorist groups. The chapter discusses the incel revolution. Here gender and race had been the primary driving forces in this rising social movement.

Chapter

Cover Contemporary Terrorism Studies

26. Preventing and Countering Violent Extremism  

Daniel Koehler

This chapter presents an overview of how to prevent and counter violent extremism programmes (P/CVE). It highlights issues on evaluation and quality standards, staff training, gender-specific P/CVE, evidence-based methods, and solid theories of change. The chapter differentiates Eastern and Western P/CVE. It shows how ideological discourse was dominant in the West, while civil society partners and non-ideological components became the main area of consideration in the East. P/CVE became the cornerstone of numerous counterterrorism strategies, but it still needs to be flexible and adaptable to needs. The chapter also recognises how prisons can turn into hotbeds of violent radicalization, and targeted assassinations of terrorists can turn them into martyrs.